The Colours of Seville

Plaza de Toros de la Maestranza

Entrance Plaza de Toros de la Maestranza, Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

Plaza de Toros de la Maestranza, Sevilla, Spain - Bold Bliss

Detail of Plaza de Toros de la Maestranza, Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

Flamenco at the cathedral

Flamenco dancer on street in Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

Alcazar

Alcazar, Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

View on garden in Alcazar, Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

Purple trees and palm trees in Alcazar, Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

Garden house in Alcazar, Sevilla, Spain - Bold Bliss

Cellar Alcazar, Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

Courtyard Alcazar, Sevilla, Spain - Bold Bliss

Water reflection of arches in courtyard Alcazar, Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

Alcazar Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

Tile work in Alcazar, Sevilla, Spain - Bold Bliss

Arches Alcazar, Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

Alcazar, Sevilla, Spain - Bold Bliss

Casa de Pilatos (see also this previous blog post shot there)

Entrance Casa de Pilatos, Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

Casa de Pilatos, Sevilla, Spain - Bold Bliss

Arches Casa de Pilatos, Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

View of the garden in Casa de Pilatos, Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

Garden of Casa de Pilatos, Sevilla, Spain - Bold Bliss

Bougainvillea Casa de Pilatos, Sevilla, Spain - Bold Bliss

Pink petals - Bold Bliss

Doorway Casa de Pilatos, Sevilla, Spain - Bold Bliss

View from the first floor of Casa de Pilatos, Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

the first floor of Casa de Pilatos, Sevilla, Spain - Bold Bliss

Ice cream in Seville, Spain - Bold Bliss

Each city has its own inimitable beauty which is impossible to catch in a few words. Qualifications such as the “city of light” for Paris or “bride of the sea” for Venice do not sufficiently express the complex allure of these cities, but reflect a dominating impression. In this way, Seville struck me as the “city of colours”.

It doesn’t take more than a glance at the above pictures to understand how the colours of Seville leave its visitors pretty mesmerised: the vibrant patterned tiles in Mudéjar-style palaces all over the town; the multi-coloured details on the bridges and benches of the splendid Plaza de España; the flowering plants in centuries-old patios behind wrought-iron latticework; the daffodil yellow and often cracking paint of so many houses and buildings; the vivid red colour of the flowers in the hair of the flamenco dancers on the street; the lovely magenta shade of the bougainvillea in the gardens of the Casa de Pilatos (the biggest one I’ve ever seen in my life); the flamboyant colours of people’s attire; and of course the deep red colour of the Sangria that brings you back to your senses after gasping in admiration as well as in exhaustion at so much sightseeing.

In this newly discovered city of colours, we visited the Plaza de España* (see this blog post shot there, TripAdvisor), Plaza de Toros de la Maestranza* (TripAdvisor), the Alcazar* (TripAdvisor), the Cathedral and Patio de los Naranjos (TripAdvisor), the Barrio Santa Cruz (Jewish neighbourhood) (see this blog post, TripAdvisor), and the Casa de Pilatos (see this separate blog post, TripAdvisor) . I have another dedicated blog post in store for the places indicated with an *. I can say that for me personally, Seville was my favourite city of Andalucía’s Golden Triangle, with the exception (unsurprisingly!) of the Alhambra in Granada.

The wealth of hues in all these places (and no doubt in many, many more that we didn’t visit as our time in Seville was limited) was almost endless. And whenever we thought we finally had seen all the colours of the Sevillian palette, a moving cloud, a slight change of position or even a blink of our eyes revealed new fascinating tints that you could have sworn weren’t there before.

 

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16 Comments

  1. Laura February 11, 2016

    This post really does have the wow factor. It’s just gorgeous! What a stunning post and beautiful images

    WOW :)

    Laura http://www.shehearts.net

    Reply
  2. Michèle July 28, 2015

    wow. incredible photos

    http://www.thefashionfraction.com

    Reply
  3. notesofglam July 28, 2015

    I love Seville architecture, this is definitely on my lists of places to visit!

    http://www.notesofglam95.blogspot.it/

    Reply
  4. Nati July 27, 2015

    Wow, amazing pictures! Seville looks so great
    Nati xx
    http://www.simplyartdicted.com

    Reply
  5. Danielle July 27, 2015

    These photos are so beautiful! What a stunning city!!

    Danielle

    http://www.blushblossom.com

    Reply
  6. Samantha Hatch July 27, 2015

    Wow these pictures are stunning. I want to go to Spain so badly! What I find so cool is that the architecture has so much influence from the Middle East. I imagine that if I went to Saudi Arabia I would see similar designs.

    –Samantha

    http://www.BesosFromAmerica.com

    Reply
  7. Mademoiselle Coconath July 27, 2015

    The pictures are beautiful!
    xx
    Mademoiselle Coconath
    http://mllecoconath.com

    Reply
  8. Jamie July 27, 2015

    absolutely stunning photos! xxo
    Jamie
    http://www.candystilettos.com

    Reply
  9. Valentina July 27, 2015

    Such a cool place. Photos are amazing too!
    Kisses
    http://www.mybubblyzone.com/

    Reply
  10. Zarrah July 27, 2015

    Wow the photos are beyond amazing.
    I love it dear :)
    So nice.

    The Bandwagon Chic | Instagram | Bloglovin | Snapchat: bandwagonchic

    Reply
  11. Rebeca July 24, 2015

    As we’d say in Spanish: Sevilla tiene un color especial :) or Seville has a special colour!! Great pics!
    http://www.stripesandots.com

    Reply
  12. Tilly Crimson July 24, 2015

    All these colours are so incredibly beautiful and important. Eliminate the red in the picture of the flamenco dancer or the fuchsia of the fallen petals and the photos are but a dime a dozen. I once read a fine poem dealing with all that. It was, I think, about a red wheelbarrow in the rain. Can’t remember the name of the poet, perhaps because it was dimmed by the redness of that wheelbarrow. Does anyone know that poem?

    Tilly Crimson

    Reply
    • Risti Lehtinen July 27, 2015

      Dear Tilly Crimson,

      That red wheelbarrow is on my retina too, together with a white chicken that made the redness of the wheelbarrow unforgettably redder. So I googled the combination of wheelbarrow and chicken and this was the result:

      so much depends
      upon

      a red wheel
      barrow

      glazed with rain
      water

      beside the white
      chickens.

      William Carlos Williams

      Risti Lehtinen

      Reply
    • Tilly Crimson July 28, 2015

      Thank you very much, Risti. What a wonderful poem! Its clear-cut denotation of the invaluable importance of colours knocked me out. I’m looking once more to the BoldBliss photo of the flamenco dancer that brought the poem back to my mind and, sorry Mr. Williams, I cannot resist the temptation to change a few words to turn your poem into a splendid caption for the photo:

      so much depends
      upon

      a crimson
      flower

      soaked in sun
      light

      on top of the
      blue dress.

      Tilly Crimson

      Reply
    • The late William Carlos Williams July 28, 2015

      Dear Tilly Crimson,

      You wrote a fine variation on my wheelbarrow poem. As a caption for the photo it is perfect, except for one word. I prefer:

      so much depends
      upon

      a sanguine
      flower

      soaked in sun
      light

      on top of the
      blue dress.

      But I admit that if my surname had been Crimson instead of Williams I might have preferred ‘crimson’ to ‘sanguine’ myself.

      The late William Carlos Williams, American poet (1883-1963)

      Reply
  13. vanessa July 24, 2015

    wonderful photos!

    TheVogueWord

    Reply

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